CO-LABS

CO-LABS

SAID Working for the Greater-Good

On the 17th July, Your Society proudly hosted a farrier workshop with the generous assistance and sponsorship of our donor, Sam Moss. Professional farriers Eamonn Harrington and Karen Badenhorst magnanimously gave of their time and skill to World Horse Welfare trained farriers from the Highveld Horse Care Unit, NSPCA and our in-house Coal Yard Project farrier, Mxolisi Zulu.

“Being very aware of the need to continue developing skills and the ongoing empowerment…”

Being very aware of the need to continue developing skills and the ongoing empowerment of the men who have employed their knowledge to create their income, we were truly blessed to see the attention and hunger for more learning that they displayed throughout the day.

Eamonn spoke passionately about his work in Ireland and being part of an organisation that monitors and manages the well-being of over 700 donkeys from rural parts of Ireland. Our Coal Yard Programme engages with 14 coal-yard owners and their 120 charges, a vast reduction from the over 350 equine we first encountered in 2004

“The simple underlying commentary from Eamonn was that a donkey is different from a horse and that shoeing these animals in the same way is a mistake commonly made.”

The simple underlying commentary from Eamonn was that a donkey is different from a horse and that shoeing these animals in the same way is a mistake commonly made.

This gives the perfect opportunity to refer to our own special boy, Chocolit, a large dark brown donkey, who was born on our farm in January 2005. Chocolit has “boxy” feet and Eamonn used this example to give his most important teaching, “trim and shoe the donkey, not the hoof.” If the donkey is walking fine with “boxy” feet, don’t attempt to shape its feet to the “perfect” shape, which could ultimately cause a problem for the animal.

Eamonn also brought a most valuable teaching for a “long donkey foot” that can be achieved in one session. This was vital for the training farriers to master as in some cases they may only be afforded one opportunity to work with a donkey.

The focus on equine community empowerment’s also paramount throughout the day. Educating and servicing equine communities requires a high level of engagement, monitoring and care. Your Society is ever thankful that we have the resources and capacity to ensure this intensity and commitment. Our equine team and everyone here at The Paddocks look forward to welcoming Eamonn back here in the near future.

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